Route Navigation

Landmark navigation creates routes taking travellers from A to B. Routes are journeys made for a reason, whether it is to go to work, fetch water, to hunt, or trade. Remove its function and a route becomes history. The cattle trails of the American west are a good example.

Each route stands alone, illustrated in Figure 4.2. A route navigator knows the way from home to work and the route from home to the shopping centre, but to pick up a can of beans coming back from work he might have to return home before he can find the shopping centre.

In unknown regions, route navigators resort to landmark navigation to be sure of their way back to known territory.

Landmark navigators are good ** at travelling in their kind of t country If they live in wetlands they are good with river craft. If they live in an archipelago or on the coast they are seamen. In the hills they are mountaineers. In a strange environment they are uncomfortable and easily disorientated.

On every journey explorers orientate themselves by looking back towards their home base.

At first journeys from Home Base are not made in any particular order and there Is no set number. It depends on the urge to explore.

Journeys are often constrained by natural features such as rivers and mountains, or by land occupied by other tribes, or by the need to visit other communities in order to trade.

On every journey explorers orientate themselves by looking back towards their home base.

At first journeys from Home Base are not made in any particular order and there Is no set number. It depends on the urge to explore.

4.1 Landmark Navigation

Was this article helpful?

0 0

Post a comment