Design of Tenagra Observatory

Figure 21.4 shows the floor plan of the scope and control rooms. The main entrance is marked and is most often used, given the control room's multiple purposes. There are two entry doors to the 3.5 m x 3.4 m (11 ft 6 in x 11 ft 2 in) telescope room. The first door is for access from the control room and the second leads directly to the scope room. The wall between the control and scope rooms has a large window that allows me to comfortably watch the scope from the computer consoles. While I...

The New Observatory

One of our pupils lived in a large house nearby. His father loaned us the services of his estate manager and some of his labourers for the duration of the project. In the summer of 1993, work began. The site was cleared and a concrete foundation laid. The rabbits disappeared, apparently unhappy about living on a building site. Brick walls, supporting the wooden runners for the roll-off roof were constructed. A central area of the floor was insulated from the surrounding concrete with...

Deep Sky Observatory

Dome Forms Building

Figure 16.1 The Newtons' home in British Columbia, housing the observatory, darkroom, machine shop, computer room and home cinema. I have been an amateur astronomer for almost forty years, yet today I find the universe as mysterious and intriguing as I did during my childhood. I took my first astrophotographs at age twelve, in an attempt to prove to my school chums that I really could resolve the rings around Saturn, even though my instrument was a tiny refractor and my vantage point the roof...

Making the Glass Fibre Dome

To construct the dome panels two glass fibre master moulds were needed, one for the side panels and one for the shutter panels. To make the master moulds, I constructed two formers out of timber and plaster. It was not hard to cut and shape the timbers to form the curve in one plane, but plaster was needed to form the curve in the other plane. Timber framing covered with hardboard was constructed to predetermined dimensions and then plaster was added and shaped by using a curved running-mould....

Patrick Moores Observatory in Selsey England

Green Fibre Glass Shed

As I am essentially an observer of the Moon and planets, it may be said that my observatory is of the old-fashioned type, and this is no doubt true enough There are four main telescopes 15 in (380mm), 12.5in (317mm) and 8.5in (216mm) reflectors, and a 5 in (127 mm) refractor. The 15 in reflector has a wooden octagonal tube, partly enclosed, and is on a massive fork mounting there is a revolving head, so that the eyepiece can always be kept in a convenient position, and there are Figure 15.1 The...

The Telescope Mounting

Once the dome was in position the observatory was watertight, which allowed work inside to progress. I could now construct the telescope mounting. I chose to use an English, or yoke, mounting (see Figure 11.7) the main reason was that it was easy to construct using only a few simple tools. The yoke consisted of 150 mm x 75 mm (6 in x 3 in) timber on the long sides and 225 mm x 75 mm (9 in x 3 in) timbers on the short sides. Mild steel plates were bolted to each end of the yoke on to which were...

Telescope and Equipment

Figure 17.2 The 500 mm Newtonian telescope, with 150 mm Schmidt-Cassegrain guide scope. The telescope (see Figure 17.2) is a 500 mm (192 in) f 4 Newtonian mounted low down on a cast aluminium equatorial with a 400 mm (15f in), 720-toothed drive wheel on the RA axis. A tangent arm drive on the declination axis allows fine control of telescope elevation. Mounted alongside the main scope I have a 150 mm (6 in) Schmidt-Cassegrain which I use as a guide scope for photography. For the past two years...

Construction

The technique of making components with glass fibre is relatively simple. A mould has first to be made onto which glass fibre matting is placed and then thoroughly impregnated with resin. When set, a shaped-glass-reinforced plastic moulding of high strength and low weight is produced. The required thickness is built up by applying the necessary number of Figure 23.2 This page and opposite Scale drawings for the glass fibre observatory. layers. It is easily sawn or drilled and is both...