Binocular Telescopes

The distinction between "binoculars" and "binocular telescopes" is fuzzy to say the least. The latter term is usually, but not exclusively, applied to binoculars larger than 150 mm (6 inch) aperture, binoculars that use Newtonian- or Cassegrainian-type optical systems, and those that are constructed from optical tubes initially intended or sold as telescope tubes, usually using eyepieces that are sold for telescopes. The majority are home constructed, but there are also commercially available models (Figures 3.6 and 3.7).

When these telescopes are home constructed, it is crucial to have a good focusing mechanism that also allows for collimation. These instruments often work at higher magnifications than equivalent binoculars, and, thus, collimation tolerances are significantly more severe. Typically, they have to be recollimated every time they are used, so ease of collimation is a must (Figure 3.8).

Figure 3.6. 250 mm

(10 inch) aperture binocular telescope by JMI. The picture shows the inside of the optical tubes. (Photo: Jim's Mobile Inc.)

Figure 3.6. 250 mm

(10 inch) aperture binocular telescope by JMI. The picture shows the inside of the optical tubes. (Photo: Jim's Mobile Inc.)

Figure 3.7. Binocular telescope by Peter Drew constructed from two 150 mm (6 inch) Synta telescopes.

Figure 3.8. The focusing, IPD, and collimation mechanism in the Synta-based binocular telescope. Collimation is achieved by adjusting the elliptical mirrors.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Telescopes Mastery

Telescopes Mastery

Through this ebook, you are going to learn what you will need to know all about the telescopes that can provide a fun and rewarding hobby for you and your family!

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment