Notes for chapter

2. The biography is referenced as Mills and Brooke, 1936. Lady Huggins' manuscript passed to a friend's brother, and after both he and his sister died, to the executor of her friend's estate, Charles E Mills. Mills and his collaborator C F Brooke, who confessed in the preface to having ''no knowledge of the mysteries of science,'' edited the partially completed manuscript and brought it out as a small book

3. Mills and Brooke (1963) p 7

4. Most of the objective information about Huggins' life and career comes from the PhD thesis of Barbara Becker — see Becker (1993) and references therein

5. See Gernsheim and Gernsheim (1958) p 720 for details of Daguerre's kit

6. See Mills and Brooke (1963) p 9

7. Quotations are all from Mills and Brooke (1936) p 17

8. Mills and Brooke (1936) pp 18-19

9. Huggins produced his own lunar photographs — see Becker (1993) pp 36-37

10. The first of these is Huggins (1856) pp 175-177

11. For an English translation and partial reprint of Kirchhoff and Bunsen's 1860 paper in Annalen der Physik und der Chemie 110 161189, see Farber (1966) pp 19-25; this quote, p 24

14. Moulton (1924) p 392

15. In 1834, for example, the positivist philosopher Auguste Comte mentioned the chemical composition of the stars as an example of a question that could never be answered by science. See, e.g., Serres et al (1975) p 301

16. See note 1 in this chapter

17. Huggins and Huggins (1909) p 6

18. Details of the experimental set-up are in a paper on the spectra of the chemical elements, Huggins and Miller (1864a), and in the paper on stellar spectroscopy, Huggins and Miller (1864b)

19. Huggins and Miller (1864b) p 413

20. Huggins and Miller (1864b) p 418

21. Huggins and Miller (1864b) p 433

22. Huggins and Miller (1864b) pp 433-434

23. Huggins and Miller (1864b) p 434

24. Huggins (1864) p 438

27. The chief nebular line was not identified until 1928. It is actually a closely spaced double line and is due to oxygen atoms in a physical state that is difficult to replicate in a laboratory

29. Discourse at Nottingham reprinted in Huggins and Huggins (1909); see p 503

30. Fournier d'Albe (1923) pp 154-155 and 172

31. Huggins (1868) pp 548, 549

32. Quoted in Becker (1993) p 213

33. Quoted in Becker (1993) p 213

34. Quoted in Becker (1993) p 215

35. Lockyer (1874) p 255

36. For biographical information about Margaret, see Bruck (1991) and Bruck and Elliott (1992)

37. Quoted in Becker (1993) p 269

38. Quoted in Becker (1993) p 273

39. Quoted in Plotkin (1982) p 323

40. Quoted in Plotkin (1982) p 326

41. For a reference to the women as Pickering's harem, see, e.g. Welther (1982) p 94

42. Davis (1898) pp 223-224

43. Quoted in Becker (1993) pp 404-405

44. Quoted in Becker (1993) p 272 n 106

45. Quoted in Becker (1993) p 272

47. His style here is so different from that of his earlier scientific papers, one wonders if Margaret influenced him to drop his normally formal and long-winded mode of expression. On the historical accuracy of the article, see Becker (1993) especially pp 5-7,83-84,324 and 416-419

48. Reprinted in parts in Huggins and Huggins (1909); see pp 5-6

49. Reprinted in Huggins and Huggins (1909) pp 523-539

50. Quoted in Becker (1993) pp 288-289

51. Quoted in Becker (1993) pp 291-292

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