Concentric Spheres

Eudoxos's basic cosmological scheme is illustrated in Figure 7.12.

Figure 7.11. Ruins of the temple of Olympian Zeus at Akragas (modern Agrigento), Sicily, one of the largest Greek temples ever constructed: Built by Carthaginian captives in 480 b.c., it was destroyed in the Carthaginian sack of Akragas in 406 b.c. (a) View from the south along main axis. (b) A now prone Telemon pillar. (c) A capital of the massive pillars. Marie Milone provides scale. Photos by E.F. Milone.

25 Greco-Roman period maps of the constellations are known only from a celestial globe that amplifies the frequent depiction of Atlas holding the heavens into a full-scale celestial map, known as the Farnese globe. See ยง2.1.1.

Figure 7.12. Sketch of the concentric spheres cosmological concept of Eudoxus: The spheres carrying the planets are nested within the sphere carrying the fixed stars. Several spheres are needed to create the motions of each planet, and the axial offset is required because of the inclinations of the planetary orbits. Drawing by E.F. Milone.

Figure 7.12. Sketch of the concentric spheres cosmological concept of Eudoxus: The spheres carrying the planets are nested within the sphere carrying the fixed stars. Several spheres are needed to create the motions of each planet, and the axial offset is required because of the inclinations of the planetary orbits. Drawing by E.F. Milone.

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