Planets

Little is known of the planets during the Old Kingdom, and even references to them are rare. A text from the time of Ramses VI refers to Mercury as "Seth in the evening twilight, a god in the morning twilight" (Neugebauer and Parker 1969, p. 181), which shows that the Egyptians had recognized Mercury as both evening star and morning star. The identification with Seth ties Mercury firmly into the Osiris cycle of myths, but we have seen no study attempting to relate the myth to astronomy. Neugebauer and Parker (1969, p. 181) say that calling Jupiter "southern star" or calling Saturn "eastern" or "western" tells us nothing; however, if an implicit time of observation could be determined, the statements would be highly meaningful. We are not willing to accept the view that such statements are meaningless vagaries. Gleadow (1969, pp. 195-196 and table 20) has taken the view that they are meaningful and has

Table 8.3. Egyptian dynastic eclipses."

Chronology

--Egyptian Total solar eclipse dates

Gardiner (dates) Clayton (dates) capitals over capitals

Chronology

--Egyptian Total solar eclipse dates

Gardiner (dates) Clayton (dates) capitals over capitals

Table 8.3. Egyptian dynastic eclipses."

I Narmer/Menes

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