Eva2 Solving The Fender Problem And Crater Exploration

Cernan and Schmitt received some rousing wakeup music in the form of Richard Wagner's Ride of the Valkyries. Gordon Fullerton was the Wakeup CapCom, and after twenty minutes of essential preliminaries, he advised the crew regarding the repair to the LRV's fender.

"Challenger, Houston. We've been working, while you've been sleeping, on a fix for the missing fender. John Young has been over working it out in the suit with the mockup Rover, and we have about five to ten minutes-worth of words on how you want to go about that. Whenever you have that much time to listen - it'll be mostly listening on your part - let us know.''

"Gordy, we're going to start to eat here. Why don't you talk to us about that fender?'' Cernan said several minutes later. John Young was summoned to the Mission Control room and sat down next to Fullerton.

"Hey, we spent some time on this fender problem,'' Young said, "and worked out a pretty simple-minded procedure, which involves essentially taking four of those cronopaque pages out of your lunar surface maps - ones which are not going to be used for discussing the site - taping them together with gray tape so that you end up with a piece of paper about 15 inches by 10.5 inches. Then, using the AOT lamp clamps, pre-position them full opened, take them out (in the ETB), take that piece of paper out (of the ETB), lay it on top of the fender guide rails, and clamp the edges of it with the AOT lamp clamps. It's simple and straightforward, and the beauty of it is

The LRV's TV camera was trained on Cernan as he took this photo of the LRV at Station 6. Transmissions were beamed directly from the LRV's distinctive gold mesh high-gain antenna directly to Earth with unprecedented resolution. The LCRU's thermal blankets were occasionally opened during station stops. (NASA)

The LRV's TV camera was trained on Cernan as he took this photo of the LRV at Station 6. Transmissions were beamed directly from the LRV's distinctive gold mesh high-gain antenna directly to Earth with unprecedented resolution. The LCRU's thermal blankets were occasionally opened during station stops. (NASA)

you're only spending about two minutes in the clamping operation, and it could save you up to about twelve [minutes of] dusting. What do you think?''

Cernan agreed with the concept and then clarified the details of how the map pages were taped together and clamped to the LRV's fender. The crew then continued with their preparations for the second EVA, and fabricated the ersatz fender repair as instructed in detail by John Young. Cernan stored the two AOT lamp clamps in his shin pocket as the two men suited up. They completed their checklist for the LM cabin, depressurized and descended to the lunar surface for their second EVA. Schmitt was particularly excited at the prospect of having a full day of exploration ahead of them without having to deploy more experiments. They went through the Cuff Check List of loading camera magazines, sample collection bags and boxes and other tasks. Then, Schmitt helped Cernan with the fender repair. With John Young in the communications loop, Schmitt held the taped maps to the fender while Cernan clamped them securely. Ed Fendell had the TV camera trained on the two astronauts as they performed the fender repair so that John Young in Mission Control could watch their progress.

"Does that look good to John, from what he did?'' Cernan asked. "It looks exactly what he did, he says,'' Parker answered.

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