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2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 radius, km nations of the planet's mass and radius resulted in a mean density of 5430 10 kg m-3 (Anderson et al. 1987), which is comparable to that of the Earth and Venus but much larger than those of the Moon and Mars (Fig. 1). Though substantially smaller in size, Mercury's surface gravity of 3.7 ms-2 almost equals that of the larger planet Mars. If extrapolated to zero-pressure, Mercury's density is about 5300 kgm-3, i.e., much higher than the uncompressed...

UVb V 2b e6

The source sink term e represents various effects possible radiogenic heat production, secular cooling, the destruction of compositional differences by mixing of the core fluid, and the loss of potential thermal buoyancy by the adiabatic gradient. On time average, e must balance the codensity flux through the boundaries. Different convective driving types can be modeled by choosing appropriate combinations of e and outer and inner boundary conditions for the codensity variable b (Kutzner and...

Nrori Po3D2

This scaling has been derived for dipole-dominated dynamos driven by vigorous convection that involves the whole fluid shell. Mercury's dynamo may actually fall into a different category, but the dependence of length scale lx on the flow vigor and the dependence of the flow vigor on the codensity flux is certainly suggestive. The actual scaling factors and also, perhaps, the exponents may differ. By combining (7) with (8), (9), and (10) we arrive at a scaling that establishes the dependence of...

G

(1) (Weidenschilling 1978) (2) (Cameron et al. 1988 Wetherill 1988) and (3) (Fegley and Cameron 1987). For further description of the models see Sect. 4.2 (1) (Weidenschilling 1978) (2) (Cameron et al. 1988 Wetherill 1988) and (3) (Fegley and Cameron 1987). For further description of the models see Sect. 4.2 et al. 1975) and tidal dissipation. In conclusion, a hot initial state of Mercury with early core formation is the most likely scenario for Mercury. The exact temperatures are unknown,...