Naudts

Discovered 1949 Aug. 2 by K. Reinmuth at Heidelberg. Named in memory of Ignace Naudts (1949-1992), active Belgian amateur astronomer, editor of the monthly magazine Heelal of the Flemish association 'Vereniging voor Sterrenkunde'. His particular fields of interest were planetary satellites and rings, chaos in the solar system, and theoretical and practical study of sundials. He was a talented mathematician, a dynamic and enthusiastic popularizer of astronomy and science. (M 21955) Name...

Stepanov

Discovered 1976 Apr. 3 by N. S. Chernykh at Nauchnyj. Named in memory of Vladimir Evgen'evich Stepanov (1913-1986), a corresponding member of the former Soviet Academy of Sciences, well-known for his work in solar physics and solar-terrestrial relations. For many years he led the solar researches at the Siberian Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation, and he did much for the development of astronomy in Siberia. (M 20835)

Christiansen

Discovered 1996 Dec. 19 at the Beijing Observatory at Xinglong. Named in honor of Wilbur N. Christiansen (1913- ), foreign member of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and unfailing friend of Chinese astronomers. A pioneer in radio astronomy, he invented and developed a series of radio telescopes that in their time provided the highest angular resolution. These were the grating telescope, the grating cross and the rotational synthesis telescope. His textbook on radio telescopes, with...

Foreword

Parents name their children. Children name their pets. Why Otherwise rational human beings put an inordinate effort into this naming activity. Some names are selected to remind the namer of some other person, place or event. In other instances, the choice of a name means something that sounds good, or is easily spelled. What's the baby's name is much more likely to be asked than some question about its state of health, its weight or the color of its eyes. People are...

Schrutka

Discovered 1938 Feb. 24 by A. Bohrmann at Heidelberg. Named in honor of the Austrian astronomer Guntram Schrutka von Rechtenstamm (1910-1995), who worked as professor of astronomy at Vienna University. In 1936 he became the first astronomer to derive the shape of minor planet (433) Eros, assuming it to be a triaxial ellipsoid. Furthermore, Schrutka is an eminent computer of cometary orbits, and he worked extensively on the difficult cases of P Tempel 1, P Tempel-Swift and P Westphal....

Bowell

Discovered 1979 Dec. 14 by E. Bowell at Anderson Mesa. Named in honor of Edward L. G. Bowell, Lowell Observatory astronomer who has made and who continues to make impressive contributions in many areas of minor planet astronomy. Following his comprehensive UBV photoelectric photometry of minor planets, he has revived and augmented the Lowell photographic astrometric program and has discovered several new objects. He also does extensive orbital work on minor planets, including the...

Statistics and Classification of the Names

This dictionary contains information on all 10038 planets which had been named at the end of 2002. The object (1) Ceres was discovered on January 1, 1801 and is thus the 'eldest' numbered and named planet (50000) Quaoar was discovered only on June 4, 2002 and represents the latest named planet. Overall 52224 planets were numbered up to the end of 2002. The distribution of the discoveries during the more than two centuries can be taken from the cumulative diagram Fig. 1. The immense increase of...

Nouda

Discovered 1992 Oct. 2 by T. Seki at Geisei. Named in memory of Tadasuke Nouda (1901-1989), Japanese astronomer. A pioneer in the field of ancient Chinese astronomy, he made important contributions to the study of early luni-solar calendars. He was a professor at the Osaka University of Education and Kyoto Sangyo University. He served as president of the Japan Calendar Association (1959-1989) and of the Oriental Astronomical Association (1965-1989). (M 32788) Name proposed by the...

Sources of Information

During the second half of the 19th century, the AN were the leading resource in this regard, because they appeared promptly and were distributed widely. The AN were both a scientific journal and a data base. Contributions taken from this source are referred to here by 'AN,' followed by the number of the volume and the column, as well as by the year. All other journals are referred to by the system of abbreviations used in Astronomy and Astrophysics Abstracts. Concurrently with the AN, the BAJ...

Bauschinger

Discovered 1939 Aug. 15 by K. Reinmuth at Heidelberg. Named in memory of Julius Bauschinger (1860-1934), eminent German astronomer, professor of astronomy and director of the Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Berlin, and the Leipzig University Observatory. For almost 15 years, Bauschinger worked on classical astrometric problems at the Munich Observatory. His extensive meridian observations resulted in two large catalogues, Munchener Sternverzeichnisse, including mean places of almost...

Sharaf

Discovered 1978 Oct. 3 by N. S. Chernykh at Nauchnyj. Named in honor of Shafika Gil'mievna Sharaf (1915), well known expert on celestial mechanics and staff member of the Institute of Theoretical Astronomy from 1939 to 1986. She co-developed an analytical theory of Pluto using the Laplace-Newcomb method and determined new orbital elements for the planet. Later she investigated the secular variations of solar radiation incident upon given area of the earth's

Birch

Discovered 1977 Feb. 11 by E. Bowell at Palomar. Named in honor of Peter V. Birch. An astronomer at the Perth Observatory since 1970, Birch made many planetary photographic observations as part of Lowell Observatory's International Planetary Patrol Program. In 1977 he was involved in the discovery of the rings of Uranus. He has also carried out a variety of photometric observations, including photoelectric lightcurves of minor planets and comets and CCD work on Comet Halley. (M 14208)...

Detre

Discovered 1940 Sept. 8 by G. Kulin at Budapest. Named in memory of Laszlo Detre (1906-1974), Hungarian astronomer well known for his work on variable stars, director of the Konkoly see planet (1445) Observatory for many years. (M 5182) Obituaries published in BAV Rundbrief, 24. Jahrg., p. 40 (1975) Coelum, Vol. 43, p. 113 (1975) Sterne Weltraum, Vol. 14, p. 83 (1975) Mitt. Astron. Ges., Nr. 38, p. 7-9 (1976).

Mohler

Discovered 1953 Oct. 8 at the Goethe Link Observatory at Brooklyn, Indiana. Named in memory of Orren C. Mohler (1908-1985), solar astronomer, director of the McMath-Hulbert Observatory (1962-1979), chairman of the department of astronomy at the University of Michigan (1962-1970), member of the board of directors of the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (1962-1974). Mohler pioneered the exploration of the infrared solar spectrum with the lead sulphide infrared...

Brumberg

Discovered 1970 Aug. 10 at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory at Nauchnyj. Named in honor of Victor Aleksandrovich Brumberg 1933- , staff member at the Institute of Theoretical Astronomy from 1958 to 1987 and the Institute of Applied Astronomy since 1988. His main scientific results are related to analytical and relativistic celestial mechanics the three-body problem, general planetary theory, lunar theory, relativistic reduction of observations, reference systems and time scales,...

Kieffer

Discovered 1985 May 13 by C. S. Shoemaker and E. M. Shoemaker at Palomar. Named in honor of Hugh Hartman Kieffer, geo-physicist with the U.S. Geological Survey and chief of the Branch of Astrogeology since 1986. Kieffer is specially recognized for his work on the geology of Mars and his participation in spacecraft missions. His laboratory studies of the spectra of water and carbon-dioxide ices, his leadership in the design of the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper, and his analysis of its...