Apollo

Three hundred kilometers east of the massive adjacent craters Albategnius and Hipparchus, you will find the Cayley plains north of the crater Descartes. It was in this rugged terrain (at 8.99° S, 15.51° E) that the Apollo 16 Lunar Module, Orion, landed and astronauts John Young and Charlie Duke (Houston Capsule

Communicator on Apollo 11) went walkabout. John Young was one of only three men to have been to the Moon twice. He had also been on Apollo 10 and was the first Shuttle commander, too. Only two other astronauts went to the Moon twice, Jim Lovell on Apollos 8 and 13 and Gene Cernan on Apollos 10 and 17. However, no one walked on the Moon on more than one mission. The region is optimally illuminated at first quarter and, although not as distinctive as the Apollo 15 site, once the crater Descartes and the smaller crater Dollond have been located you will have the region in the eyepiece field. Apollo 16 landed on the Moon on April 20, 1972. See Figure 10.8.

Figure 10.8. The Apollo 16 landing site. The Craters Albategnius (lower) and Hipparchus are on the right hand side of this 500-kilometer wide image taken with the 74-inch Kottamia reflector in Egypt in 1965. Apollo 16 landed just north of the white area north of the crater Descartes. From an image provided by the late Dr. T.W. Rackham.

Figure 10.8. The Apollo 16 landing site. The Craters Albategnius (lower) and Hipparchus are on the right hand side of this 500-kilometer wide image taken with the 74-inch Kottamia reflector in Egypt in 1965. Apollo 16 landed just north of the white area north of the crater Descartes. From an image provided by the late Dr. T.W. Rackham.

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