Project 2 the stars piggybacking

Taking dramatic pictures of the stars and Milky Way is easy if you have an equatorially mounted telescope (Chapter 4). Load your camera with color slide film that has low reciprocity failure and a strong response to deep red light Kodak Elite Chrome 200 or E200 Professional is an excellent choice. Attach the camera to the telescope somehow, either on a piggyback bracket or by any convenient means. The camera and telescope need not point in exactly the same direction, though they should be...

Automatic setup with GPS

Some newer Celestron and Meade telescopes have a built-in GPS receiver for determining the latitude, longitude, and time, as well as a built-in magnetic compass and level sensor. Such a telescope can practically set itself up - or can it The answer is yes. Note however that you must still center the alignment stars yourself. (The obvious next step would be a photoelectric finderscope to do this automatically too ) What is automated is the initial process of entering the site data, leveling the...

Troubleshooting

This chapter gives quick solutions to a number of common problems that are likely to puzzle a new telescope owner. This list is far from complete. For more information, see your instruction book, as well as Chapters 10-12 and the websites mentioned there. 8.1 Electrical and computer problems Check all fuses. On the LX200, there is a fuse inside the connector panel as well as in the power cable. Check keypad and declination cables too. If deprived of any of its necessary connections, the...

Tripods and piers 381 Steadiness

Really sturdy telescope mounts are not portable, and vice versa. At an observatory, you can tap the side of the telescope tube, and the image won't move not so in the field. A good portable mount will shake for about one second after you lightly touch the side of the eyepiece a light-duty mount will shake longer. For visual astronomy, you can use a relatively light-duty mount as long as it doesn't shake while you're observing. Basic astrophotography requires a medium-duty mount, and serious...

Right ascension and declination

The alert reader will notice that Figures 2.1 and 2.2 are crisscrossed by lines that look like latitude and longitude on a globe. That's exactly what they are, but the globe to which they refer is the celestial sphere (Figure 2.3). This is an imaginary sphere, infinitely large, surrounding the Earth, on which the stars have fixed positions. Since the sphere is imaginary, its motion can be imaginary too, so astronomers pretend that the Earth holds still (with the observer's location right on...

Collimating a Schmidt Cassegrain

The only adjustment on a Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope is the alignment of the secondary mirror, located in the middle of the corrector plate. To adjust it, tighten or loosen any of the three adjusting screws (Figure 5.8) the secondary mirror is balanced on a pivot between them. To do the adjustment, aim the telescope at a star high in the sky, throw it out of focus, and then adjust until the image is a concentric doughnut (Figure 5.9). Rather than try to figure out in advance which screw to...

Must field rotation be eliminated

Field Rotation Astrophotography

Equatorial mounts get rid of the field rotation illustrated in Figure 4.2. Celestial objects tilt as they rise, travel across the sky, and set. An equatorially mounted telescope tilts with them, so that everything remains stationary in the field of view, but altazimuth-mounted telescopes suffer field rotation. With an altazimuth mount, the object that you're tracking remains centered, but everything else rotates around it. Can you make do with an altazimuth mount Maybe. Field rotation does not...

How to Use a Computerized Telescope

Cambridge, New York, Melbourne, Madrid, Cape Town, Singapore, Sao Paulo Cambridge University Press The Edinburgh Building, Cambridge CB2 8RU, UK Published in the United States of America by Cambridge University Press, New York www.cambridge.org Information on this title www.cambridge.org 9780521007900 Michael A. Covington 2002 This publication is in copyright. Subject to statutory exception and to the provision of relevant collective licensing agreements, no reproduction of any part may take...