Meteor

Butler, Samuel

This hairy meteor did denounce The fall of Scepters and of Crowns;...

Hudibras First Part Canto I, L. 245-6

Caithness, James Balharrie

Wonderful, shimmering trail of light, Falling from whence on high! Flooding the world in thy moment's flight With the sense of a mystery! Softly thy radiance works a spell, Night is enhanced, as a note may swell From a simple melody.

Pastime Poems The Meteor

Darwin, Erasmus

Ethereal Powers! You chase the shooting stars, Or yoke the vollied lightnings to your cars.

The Botanic Garden Part I, Canto I, II, L. 115

Devaney, James

The coming of this lovely night Lifted the world's great roof of blue And bared the awful Infinite— So grand an hour, so vast a view, Abashed I stand each night anew:

When out of unimagined deeps

Spectacular you burst upon

The dark, and down the starry steeps

A trail of whitest fire you shone

One breathless moment—and were gone.

Where The Wind Goes To A Falling Star

Frost, Robert

Did you stay up last night (the Magi did) To see the star shower known as Leonid That once a year by hand or apparatus Is so mysteriously pelted at us?

Complete Poems of Robert Frost A Loose Mountain

Hoffman, Jeffrey

Suddenly I saw a meteor go by underneath me. A moment later I found myself thinking, That can't be a meteor. Meteors burn up in the atmosphere above us; this was below us. Then, of course, the realization hit me.

In Kevin W. Kelley The Home Planet With Plate 10

Plum, David

Then bear us, O Earth, with our eyes upward gazing, To the place where the Star-God his fireworks displays; When countless as snowflakes are meteors blazing With their red, green and orange and amber-like rays.

New York Evening Post Meteors November 20, 1866

Revelation 9:1-2

And the fifth angel sounded, and I saw a star fall from heaven unto the earth: and to him was given the key of the bottomless pit. And he opened the bottomless pit; and there arose a smoke out of the pit, as the smoke of a great furnace; and the sun and the air were darkened.

The Bible

Revelation 12:3-4

And behold a great red dragon, having seven heads and ten horns and seven crowns upon his heads. And his tail drew the third part of the stars of heaven and did cast them to the earth.

The Bible

Shakespeare, William

And certain stars shot madly from their spheres.

A Midsummer-Night's Dream Act II, scene i, L. 153

Smythe, Daniel

A curve of fire traces the dark And warns us of a visitor. It makes an unfamiliar mark And then is seen no more.

Tennyson, Alfred

Now slides the silent meteor on, and leaves A shining furrow, as thy thoughts in me.

The Complete Poetical Works of Tennyson The Princess VII

Teasdale, Sara

I saw a star slide down the sky, Blinding the north as it went by, Too burning and too quick to hold, Too lovely to be bought or sold, Good only to make wishes on And then forever to be gone.

Nature Magazine The Meteor (p. 493) Volume 50, Number 9, November 1957

The Collected Poems of Sara Teasdale The Falling Star

Unknown

A rock from space that falls to earth is called a meteorite. However, if it lands to the left of you it's called a meteorleft.

Source unknown

Far better 'tis, to die the death that flashes gladness, than alone, in frigid dignity, to live on high.

Better, in burning sacrifice, be thrown against a world to perish, than the sky to circle endlessly a barren stone.

Nature

Nature and Science in Poetry (p. 295) Volume 132, Number 3330, August 26, 1933

Nature

Nature and Science in Poetry (p. 295) Volume 132, Number 3330, August 26, 1933

A rock from space that falls to earth is called a meteorite. However, if it lands to the left of you it's called a meteorleft. Unknown - (See p. 190)

Virgil

And oft, before tempestuous winds arise, The seeming stars fall headlong from the skies, And, shooting through the darkness, gild the night With sweeping glories and long trains of light.

The Works of Virgil Georgics Book 1 (p. 374)

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