Phenomenon

du Nouy, Pierre Lecomte

When we speak of a phenomenon, we speak only of an event, or of a succession of events, arbitrarily isolated from the universe whose evolution they share. By isolating a fact in order to study it, we give it a beginning and an end, which are artificial and relative. In relation to the evolution of the universe, birth is not a beginning, and death is not an end. There are no more isolated phenomena in nature than there are isolated notes in a melody.

Jevons, W. Stanley

...every strange phenomenon may be a secret spring which if rightly touched, will open the door to new chambers in the palace of nature.

Principles of Science Book V Chapter XXIX (p. 671)

LaPlace, Pierre Simon

The phenomena of nature are most often enveloped by so many strange circumstances, and so great a number of disturbing causes mix their influence, that it is very difficult to recognize them.

A Philosophical Essay on Probabilities Chapter IX (p. 73)

Wilson, Edward O.

...all tangible phenomena, from the birth of stars to the workings of social institutions, are based on material processes that are ultimately reducible, however long and tortuous the sequences, to the laws of physics.

Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge Chapter 12 (p. 266)

PHENOMENON.

...There are no more isolated phenomena in nature than there are isolated notes in a melody.

Pierre Lecomte du Noiiy - (See p. 239)

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