Satellites for sale the fourteenth Shuttle mission

The fourteenth mission of the Shuttle programme and the second for orbiter Discovery (OV-103) was originally scheduled for 7 November 1984. Despite a crystal clear day in Florida and all systems seemingly working properly, the launch was scrubbed due to excessive wind speed between the 20,000- and 40,000-foot levels. All was fine the following day, 8 November, with Discovery making its return to space without incident. The two commercial satellites were deployed by the crew during FD 2 and FD 3, with Allen managing the deployment of Anik D2 and Anna Fisher deploying Leasat 2 the next day. The precise chase to reach the two stranded satellites deployed from STS 41-B passed without incident and the two resulting EVAs (6 hours on 12 November and 5 hours 42 minutes on 14 November) successfully brought both rogue satellites back into the payload bay of the orbiter for the journey home. After the completion of a number of mid-deck experiments, Discovery returned to Earth with the two satellites safely aboard on 16 November, after a flight of 7 days 23 hours 44 minutes 56 seconds, during orbit 127. Flight Director Jay Greene highlighted the huge achievement of the mission by saying: ''We've deployed satellites before; we've picked up satellites before; we've rendezvoused before; and we've repaired a satellite before. But we've never before done all of these things together on one flight.''

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Renewable Energy Eco Friendly

Renewable Energy Eco Friendly

Renewable energy is energy that is generated from sunlight, rain, tides, geothermal heat and wind. These sources are naturally and constantly replenished, which is why they are deemed as renewable.

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