Cassiopeia

Camelopardalis Camelopardalis (Cam)

width ll depth ll size RANKING 18th fuLLY vislBLE 90°n-3°s

Camelopardalis is a large but dim constellation of the far northern sky, representing a giraffe. Its long neck stretches around the north celestial pole between Ursa Minor and the tail of Draco. Not one of northern the original Greek constellations, HEMispHERE it was introduced in the early 17 th century by the Dutch astronomer Petrus Plancius.

KEMBLE's cAscADE

Like drops of water squirted from a toy pistol, the stars of Kemble's Cascade extend for five full-moon diameters of sky near the small cluster NGC 1502 at lower left.

KEMBLE's cAscADE

Like drops of water squirted from a toy pistol, the stars of Kemble's Cascade extend for five full-moon diameters of sky near the small cluster NGC 1502 at lower left.

BETA (ß) cAMELopARDAüs 1 5 The constellation's brightest star, at magnitude 4.0. It is a double with a wide 8th-magnitude companion that can be seen with small telescopes or even powerful binoculars.

NGC 1502 H 5 A small open star cluster visible through binoculars and small telescopes. It has a 7th-magnitude double star at its center that is easily divided by small telescopes.

KEMBLE's cascade h A chain of faint stars visible through binoculars that stretches for five Moon diameters from NGC 1502 toward Cassiopeia. This star chain is named after Lucian Kemble, a Canadian amateur astronomer who first drew attention to it.

Lynx Lyncis (Lyn)

width im depth im size RANKING 28th fuLLY vislBLE 90°n-28°s

Polish astronomer Johannes Hevelius introduced this constellation in the late 17 th century to fill the gap in the northern sky between Ursa Major and Auriga. It gained its name because Hevelius felt that only the lynx-eyed would be able to see it.

features of interest

12 lyncis 5 A star that appears through a small telescope as a double of 5th and 7th magnitudes. Apertures of 3 in (75 mm) will divide the brighter star again. This pair, of magnitudes 5.5 and 6.1, forms a binary with an orbital period of about 700 years.

19 LYNCIS 5 A pair of stars of 6th and 7th magnitudes with a wider 8th-magnitude companion, all visible with small telescopes

38 LYNCIS 5 A closer double, of 4th and 6th magnitudes. A telescope with a 3-in (75-mm) aperture is needed to divide it.

M36, M37, M38 K 5 Three large and bright open star clusters, embedded in a rich part of the Milky Way. All three will just fit within the same field of view in wide-angle binoculars.

M36, M37, M38 K 5 Three large and bright open star clusters, embedded in a rich part of the Milky Way. All three will just fit within the same field of view in wide-angle binoculars.

Auriga Aurigae (Aur) width ll depth ll size ranking 21

A prominent constellation of the northern sky, Auriga contains the most northerly first-magnitude star, Capella Lying in the Milky Way between Gemini and Perseus, to the north of Orion, Auriga represents a charioteer, usually identified in Greek mythology as erichthonius, a legendary king of Athens features of interest

EpSILoN (s) aurigae 2 K A luminous supergiant orbited by a mysterious dark companion that eclipses it every 27 years, the longest interval of any eclipsing binary. During the eclipses, it remains dimmed for over a year.

zeta (z) aurigae 2 K An orange giant orbited by a smaller blue star, which eclipses it every 2.7 years, decreasing its brightness from magnitude 3.7 to 4.0, for six weeks.

northern

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