Features Of Interest

ALPHA (a) CENTAURI (RIGIL KENTAURUS) 2 5 A celebrated multiple star. To the naked eye, it appears of magnitude -0.3, making it the third-brightest star in the sky, but a small telescope shows it to be a double of two yellow stars that orbit each other every 80 years. They appear so bright because they are a mere 4.4 light-years away. Only one star is closer to us—the third member of the system, Proxima Centauri, a faint lith-magnitude red dwarf.

OMEGA (ra) CENTAURI (NGC 5139) 2 1 5 The largest and brightest globular cluster. To the eye, it appears like a large, hazy star.

NGC 3918 (THE BLUE PLANETARY) 5 A planetary nebula easily visible through small telescopes, appearing like a larger version of the disk of Uranus.

NGC 5128 (CENTAURUS A) 1 5 S 3 A peculiar galaxy and a strong radio source, thought to be a merging giant elliptical and spiral galaxy.

This is a southern constellation lying on the edge of the Milky Way between the better-known figures of Centaurus and Scorpius Lupus was one of the original 48 constellations known to the ancient Greeks, who visualized it as a wild animal speared by Centaurus. It contains numerous double stars of interest to amateur observers.

This is a southern constellation lying on the edge of the Milky Way between the better-known figures of Centaurus and Scorpius Lupus was one of the original 48 constellations known to the ancient Greeks, who visualized it as a wild animal speared by Centaurus. It contains numerous double stars of interest to amateur observers.

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