Features Of Interest

ALPHA (a) LEONIS (REGULUS) 2 1 5 The brightest star in the constellation at magnitude 1.4. Small telescopes or binoculars show a wide companion of 8th magnitude.

GAMMA (y) LEONIS (ALGIEBA) 5 A golden pair, of magnitudes 2.2 and 3.5, that can be divided by small telescopes with high magnification. Both are orange giants orbiting each other every 600 years or so.

ZETA (Z) LEONIS 1 A wide triple in the Sickle of Leo. Zeta is of 3rd magnitude, with unrelated 6th-magnitude stars to the north and south of it that are visible through binoculars.

M65 AND M66 5 A pair of spiral galaxies lying beneath the hindquarters of Leo that can be glimpsed through small telescopes. They are tilted at steep angles to us and so appear elongated.

M95 AND M96 5 A fainter pair of spiral galaxies, visible through moderate-sized telescopes.

THE SiCKLE OF LEO

The six stars—Epsilon (e), Mu (m), Zeta (Q, Gamma (Z), Eta (n), and Alpha (a) Leonis (Regulus)—that form the Sickle of Leo are clearly visible at the right of this photograph. The brightest, Alpha (a) Leonis, marks the end of the handle of the Sickle.

THE SiCKLE OF LEO

The six stars—Epsilon (e), Mu (m), Zeta (Q, Gamma (Z), Eta (n), and Alpha (a) Leonis (Regulus)—that form the Sickle of Leo are clearly visible at the right of this photograph. The brightest, Alpha (a) Leonis, marks the end of the handle of the Sickle.

Virgo Virginis (Vir) width iimm depth imm size RANKING 2nd fuLLY vislBLE 67°n-75°s

The largest constellation of the zodiac and the second-largest overall, Virgo is shaped like a sloping Y with its brightest star, spica, at the southern tip. On its northern border lies the nearest large cluster of galaxies, some 50 million light-years away the sun is within the boundaries of Virgo at the september equinox each year.

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