Hemisphere

features of interest gamma (g) arietis 5 A double star with nearly identical white components of magnitudes 4.6 and 4.7, easily divisible through small telescopes.

lambda (!) ARIETIS 1 5 A 5th-magnitude star with a 7th-magnitude companion, visible through large binoculars or a small telescope.

THE crooked LINE of ARIES

This line is formed by Aries' three brightest stars—Alpha (a), Beta (P), and Gamma (g). Also visible in this photograph are Venus (below) and Mars to the left of Aries.

gamma arietis

To the naked eye, Gamma (g) Arietis appears of magnitude 3.9, but through a small telescope, it is seen to be a striking double. This CCD image shows its two very similar components.

THE crooked LINE of ARIES

This line is formed by Aries' three brightest stars—Alpha (a), Beta (P), and Gamma (g). Also visible in this photograph are Venus (below) and Mars to the left of Aries.

fiRST POiNT Of ARiES AD 1500-3000

THE FIRST poiNT of ARIES

In ancient Greek times, over 2,000 years ago, the vernal equinox—the point at which the ecliptic crosses the celestial equator—lay near the border of Aries and Pisces. The effect of precession (see p.133) has now moved the vernal equinox almost into Aquarius, but it is still called the first point of Aries. This chart shows its movement between the years ad 1500 and 3000.

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