The laws of planetary motion

Tycho bequeathed his observations to his assistant, a brilliant German mathematician named Johannes Kepler (1571-1630). After many years of diligent calculation,

Kepler discovered that the planets do indeed orbit the Sun as Copernicus had proposed, but not in complex combinations of circles and epicycles.

celestial globe

The positions of the stars on this globe of 1603, made by Willem Janzsoon Blaeu, were plotted according to the catalog of Tycho Brahe.

on the revolutions of the heavenly spheres

Nicolaus Copernicus published his theory of the universe in the year he died, 1543, in a book titled On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres. In it, he argued that Earth was not the center of the universe, as had been supposed since ancient Greek times, but that the Sun was at the center and Earth was a planet in orbit around it. His theory had one major drawback—it still described the orbits of the planets as combinations of circles and epicycles. Despite its importance in the history of human thought, his book sold so few copies on publication that it has been dubbed "the book that nobody read."

COPERNiOIS AND A COPY Of ON THE REVOLUTIONS Of THE HEAVENLY SPHERES

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