Where On Earth

How much of the celestial sphere you can see depends on your latitude on earth—that is, how far north or south of the equator you are. if you were stationed exactly at earth's north pole, with the north celestial pole directly above your head, you would only ever be able to see the northern hemisphere of sky. if, instead, you were at the equator (with the celestial equator above you), you would be able to see all the way from there to the celestial poles, which would lie on your northern and southern horizons. As earth turned, the objects on the celestial sphere would rise in the east and set in the west, and you would be able to see them all in the course of a year.

Of course, most people live at intermediate latitudes, so their view of the sky lies somewhere between these two extremes. They will be able to see all of one celestial hemisphere over a year, plus a part of the other. The closer you are to the equator, the greater the percentage of the celestial sphere you get to see.

north celestial pole lies directly above Earth's north pole Earth's spins vernal or spring equinox (first point of Aries)

Earth's axis is line perpendicular to ecliptic plane (plane of Earth's orbit)

Earth's axis is line perpendicular to ecliptic plane (plane of Earth's orbit)

Sun Pointing Equator

autumnal equinox (first point of Libra), one of two points of intersection between the celestial equator and ecliptic

Sun's motion celestial equator (circle on the celestial sphere concentric with Earth's equator)

the south celestial pole lies below Earth's south pole

Sun's motion celestial equator (circle on the celestial sphere concentric with Earth's equator)

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