Level III the many worlds of quantum physics

If the fundamental equations of physics are unitary, as they so far appear to be, then the universe keeps dividing into parallel branches. Whenever a quantum event appears to have a random outcome, all outcomes should occur, one in each branch. This is illustrated by the bottom cartoon

Electromagnetic coupling constant a

Fig. 7.4. Hints of fine-tuning for the parameters a and as, which determine the strengths of the electromagnetic force and the strong nuclear force, respectively. The observed values (a, as) « (1/137,0.1) are indicated by a filled square. Grand unified theories rule out everything except the narrow strip between the two vertical lines, and deuterium becomes unstable below the horizontal line. In the narrow shaded region to the very left, electromagnetism is weaker than gravity and therefore irrelevant. From ref. [16].

Electromagnetic coupling constant a

Fig. 7.4. Hints of fine-tuning for the parameters a and as, which determine the strengths of the electromagnetic force and the strong nuclear force, respectively. The observed values (a, as) « (1/137,0.1) are indicated by a filled square. Grand unified theories rule out everything except the narrow strip between the two vertical lines, and deuterium becomes unstable below the horizontal line. In the narrow shaded region to the very left, electromagnetism is weaker than gravity and therefore irrelevant. From ref. [16].

in Fig. 7.5 and corresponds to the Level III multiverse. Although more controversial than Level I and Level II, we will see that (surprisingly) this level adds no new types of universes.

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