Nasa 008a

Gauss, Endymion S Mare Humboldtianum seen by Galileo spacecraft, 1992

Mare Humboldtianum 81.50 E 56.80 N

Mare Humboldtianum (Humboldt's Sea) is a difficult visual object because its rim extends to the farside of the Moon. A better terrestial view is given in T180 and T103, when the libration was favorable. Mare Humboldtianum is physically the central lava-flooded portion of a multi-ring impact basin. The lava floor is 270 km in diameter, but the whole basin including the outer concentric walls is 600 km across. See also the non-oblique view of Mare Humboldtianum in the NASA image (previous page).

Mare Humboldtianum
2004.08.01 16:50 UT Age 15 days. Librabon 4.&°(long.) 6.5°[¡at.) 10-in 1/6 + 2.5X + ToUcam at 1/100», 9 frames stacked.

A disintegrated walled plain with small off-centered craters, 134 km in diameter. It is named after the British amateur astronomer Warren de la Rue (1815-89). He was the first to produce a copper plate for printing from a photographic negative of the Moon.

Thales 50.3"E 61.8"N Strabo Thales is a rayed crater, 31 km in diameter. The neighboring Strabo (55 km) is non-rayed.

2004.12.17 10:43-10:46 UT

10-ln fl6 Newtonian + 2.SX + ToUcam (mosaic)

2004.12.17 10:43-10:46 UT

10-ln fl6 Newtonian + 2.SX + ToUcam (mosaic)

Tycho, Clavius, Maginus, Deslandres, Pitatus, Hesiodus

Hatfield 10

Tycho Crater Nasa

Tycho and its system of rays

The rays are lines of deposits of highland rocks and debris ejected from the Tycho impact. The X denotes the site where regolith (lunar soil) was examined by Surveyor 7 probe in 1968.

Tycho and its system of rays

The rays are lines of deposits of highland rocks and debris ejected from the Tycho impact. The X denotes the site where regolith (lunar soil) was examined by Surveyor 7 probe in 1968.

Tycho 11.10 W 43.40 S

Tycho is a prominent object in the Southern Highlands. It has a nominal diameter of 102 km (cavity 85 km), depth 4800 m. The central peak is 2300 m high. During the full moon, Tycho stands out as the brightest beacon with a system of long rays ranging to 1800 km. It is this system of rays that shows Tycho is a very young impact crater, about 110 million years old. The dark halo is impact melt, which will be diminished by space weathering over time. Shortly after the first quarter, Tycho appears as an abyss surrounded by thick walls (T053, next page).

Clavius 14.10 W 58.80 S

Clavius is a spectacular, vast walled plain in the Southern Highlands, diameter 245 km. Its walls are broken by crater Rutherfurd (48 km) and Porter (51 km), and there are ridges running between them, see T080 & T085. Note also the L-shaped relief near Porter. An arc-array of craters extends across the floor, which also contains many craterlets and small hills. Clavius is best seen shortly after first quarter or before last quarter but hardly visible during the full moon.

Newton 16.90 W 76.70 S

A crater close to the south limb, 78 km in diameter. Its depth is not ascertained, probably over 6000~8000 m. Details in T197, Event 1| pages.

2001 Cratere Tycho

Clavius right on the terminator

It looks like an abyss. The inside craters are Clavius D (larger) and Clavius C.

Clavius on terminator 2000.1105 13:50UT Age9days FS12ß*QV230C

Clavius right on the terminator

It looks like an abyss. The inside craters are Clavius D (larger) and Clavius C.

Clavius on terminator 2000.1105 13:50UT Age9days FS12ß*QV230C

Clavius just outside the terminator.

Clavius just outside the terminator.

TyChO '

TyChO '

Wilhelm *

Clavius outside terminator 2001.08,11 20:21 UT Age 22 days. C9 + LE12.5 + CP990 DSCN9622

0 0

Post a comment