Plato And Saving The Appearances

The guiding themata or paradigm of Greek planetary astronomy is attributed to Plato by the philosopher Simplicius of Athens in his commentary on Aristotle's book On the Heavens. Around a.d. 500 Simplicius wrote that Plato had set as a task for astronomers to explain the apparently irregular motions of the planets, the Sun, and the Moon as a combination of circular motions with constant speeds of rotation. To save the appearances with a system of uniform circular motions is, in the context of...

Eudoxus And Concentric Spheres

Concentric Spheres Aristotle

Plato encouraged a new approach to astronomy to devise a combination of uniform circular motions to reproduce the observed motions in the heavens. Whether the Platonic paradigm would die in infancy or grow in strength depended, in part, on the support it received. Greek society supported playwrights when the citizens of Athens paid to see the productions of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides and prizes were awarded at festivals to poets and musicians. No city held geometry in high regard,...